On July 1, 1940, the Tacoma Narrows Bridge, at that time the third longest suspension span in the world, was finally built. 

But four months later, the bridge, also known as  “Galloping Gertie,” had a brutal ending!

Tacoma Narrows Bridge Collapse "Gallopin' Gertie", Tacoma Narrows Bridge Collapse "Gallopin' Gertie" video, video of Tacoma Narrows Bridge Collapse "Gallopin' Gertie", amazing earth phenomenon: video of Tacoma Narrows Bridge Collapse "Gallopin' Gertie", Tacoma Narrows Bridge Collapse, Tacoma Narrows Bridge (1940), bridge construction failure, bridge construction failure video: the tacoma narrows bridge collapse, The 1940 Tacoma Narrows Bridge collapsing in a 42 miles per hour (68 km/h) gust on November 7 1940. Photo: Barney Elliott, Tacoma-Narrows-Brücke, Tacoma-Narrows-Brücke video, Tacoma Narrows Bridge effondrement, vidéo de l'effondrement du Tacoma Narrows Bridge, pont de Tacoma effondrement vidéo, effondrement du pont du détroit de Tacoma en vidéo
The 1940 Tacoma Narrows Bridge collapsing in a 42 miles per hour (68 km/h) gust on November 7 1940. Photo: Barney Elliott

The majestuous bridge across Puget Sound started swaying like a river and collapsed during a windstorm (42 mile-per-hour wind) on November 7, 1940. This is a sound version of the event:

The most dramatic failure in bridge engineering

The Tacoma Narrows Bridge is probably best known as “the most dramatic failure in bridge engineering history.” To discourage salvagers, Galloping Gertie has been declared a National Historic Landmark. Here a longer and color version video of this incredible phenomenon:

A real American saga

This story is known around the world… A real American saga. No reports of casualties except a dog trapped in a car stranded on the bridge. Although a rescue was attempted the frightened animal would not leave the car. This amazing accident has changed how engineers now design suspension bridges by using the safer and moderner suspension spans of today. The Tacoma Narrows Bridge has been reconstructed in 1950 as a pair of twin suspension bridges.

What did happen?

[quote_box_center]In many physics textbooks, the event is presented as an example of elementary forced resonance with the wind providing an external periodic frequency that matched the bridge’s natural structural frequency, though the actual cause of failure was aeroelastic flutter.[/quote_box_center]

Follow us: Facebook and Twitter

1 COMMENT

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.