Huge mysterious underwater craters discovered in Swiss lake created by erupting groundwater or methane-gas explosions

Four giant craters were found by accident in the muddy floor of Lake Neuchâtel.

The biggest crater is 525 feet (160 meters) wide and almost 100 feet (30 m) deep. Their origin is unknown: Erupting groundwater or methane-gas explosions?

underwater crater lake neuchatel, giant underwater crater swiss lake, giant craters found in swiss lake, lake neuchatel giant craters, 4 huge craters found in lake neuchatel, 4 giant craters found in swiss lake, The "Crazy crater", also known as Chez-le-Bart crater, has a diameter of 160 m and is one of the largest found in a freshwater lake. Image from Reusch et al. 2015, The "Crazy crater", also known as Chez-le-Bart crater, has a diameter of 160 m and is one of the largest found in a freshwater lake. Image from Reusch et al. 2015
The “Crazy crater”, also known as Chez-le-Bart crater, has a diameter of 160 m and is one of the largest found in a freshwater lake. Image from Reusch et al. 2015

The underwater sinkholes are among the largest and deepest pockmarks ever found in Earth’s lakes.

The giant craters are similar in size to seafloor pockmarks created by methane-gas explosions.

But the researchers think that erupting groundwater excavated these crazy craters. According to the lead author, these craters are, in fact, springs.

The Treytel crater in Lake Neuchatel contains three active pits which expel water actively., underwater crater lake neuchatel, giant underwater crater swiss lake, giant craters found in swiss lake, lake neuchatel giant craters, 4 huge craters found in lake neuchatel, 4 giant craters found in swiss lake, The "Crazy crater", also known as Chez-le-Bart crater, has a diameter of 160 m and is one of the largest found in a freshwater lake. Image from Reusch et al. 2015, The "Crazy crater", also known as Chez-le-Bart crater, has a diameter of 160 m and is one of the largest found in a freshwater lake. Image from Reusch et al. 2015
The Treytel crater in Lake Neuchatel contains three active pits which expel water actively. Image from Reusch et al. 2015

They look like crop circles! Underwater crop circles!

The 4 large underwater craters were discovered by accident by geologists in the northwestern area of Lake Neuchâtel. The experts were indeed studying the bottom of the lake for evidence of past earthquakes when they stumbled upon large circular holes in the lake sediments!

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