The Kalama River turned white baffling scientists – Next eruption from Mount St. Helens?

The Kalama River turned white on October 11, 2015 and ran about a week in this color.

Although local scientists believe the color originated from volcanic sediment from Mount St. Helens, they have actually no clear ideas. And this is exactly what happened before latest activity.

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Scientists baffled about the mysterious white color of Kalama River near Mount St. Helens.

The Kalama River turned milky white on October 11, 2015 and ran like this about a week before the color disappeared.

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But why did the Kalama River turn white? Photo: Bryce Glaser, WDFW

Local scientists think volcanic sediment from Mount St. Helens, mainly ash, turned the Kalama River white. But the origin of this mysterious color is still unclear.

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Sign for a next Mount St. Helens eruption?

Coincidence or not, this strange phenomenon also happened about a week before Mount St. Helens rumbled in 2004 in the weeks prior to Mount St. Helens’ catastrophic blast on May 18, 1980.

So is the ‘white’ river a predictor for future eruptions?

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Mount St. Helens eruption in 1980. Photo: Richard Bowen

I would not say that this is predicting another eruption. I’m not gonna say never, right? But this appears to be related to the heavy rains on Oct. 10th, said a USGS geologist.

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