Unusual M5.4 earthquake strikes South Korea: Heavy damage, several injured, no radiocative mess

An unusual 5.4-magnitude earthquake struck Pohang at 5:29 p.m. UTC on November 15, 2017, causing at least 7 injuries and heavy damage. The strongest quake was preceded by a series of minor quakes and followed by others including a 4.6-magnitude quake, that shook many parts of the country, including Seoul nearly 300 kilometers away. Concrete debris, iron beams, brick walls, electricity poles and glass fell onto streets, destroying parked vehicles. Handong Global University students have been evacuated after walls of one of the campus buildings crumbled. Luckily, the quakes didn’t affect nuclear reactors that are concentrated in the nation’s southeastern region, with six nuclear reactors in Gyeongju, about 35 kilometers south of the epicenter.

M5.4 earthquake hits South Korea on November 15 2017, M5.4 earthquake hits South Korea on November 15 2017 pictures, M5.4 earthquake hits South Korea on November 15 2017 video
M5.4 earthquake hits South Korea on November 15 2017. via USGS
M5.4 earthquake hits South Korea on November 15 2017, M5.4 earthquake hits South Korea on November 15 2017 pictures, M5.4 earthquake hits South Korea on November 15 2017 video
The series of powerful earthquakes struck the southeastern city of Pohang, Wednesday, shaking many parts of the country, including Seoul nearly 300 kilometers away.
M5.4 earthquake hits South Korea on November 15 2017, M5.4 earthquake hits South Korea on November 15 2017 pictures, M5.4 earthquake hits South Korea on November 15 2017 video
Concrete debris, iron beams and glass fell onto streets, destroying parked vehicles, brick walls and electricity poles. via Korea Times
M5.4 earthquake hits South Korea on November 15 2017, M5.4 earthquake hits South Korea on November 15 2017 pictures, M5.4 earthquake hits South Korea on November 15 2017 video
Seven reported minor injuries; fire departments responded to 42 rescue calls; over 7,000 were made to the emergency hotline 911. via Korea Times
M5.4 earthquake hits South Korea on November 15 2017, M5.4 earthquake hits South Korea on November 15 2017 pictures, M5.4 earthquake hits South Korea on November 15 2017 video
Houses have been damaged around the epicenter of the M5.4 earthquake in South Korea. via Korea Times
M5.4 earthquake hits South Korea on November 15 2017, M5.4 earthquake hits South Korea on November 15 2017 pictures, M5.4 earthquake hits South Korea on November 15 2017 video
Korea Hydro & Nuclear Power said the six nuclear reactors in Gyeongju, about 35 kilometers south of the epicenter, as well as other reactors on the southeastern coast are all functioning normally. via World Nuclear
M5.4 earthquake hits South Korea on November 15 2017, M5.4 earthquake hits South Korea on November 15 2017 pictures, M5.4 earthquake hits South Korea on November 15 2017 video
Damage in a grocery store after M5.4 earthquake in South Korea. via Korea Times
M5.4 earthquake hits South Korea on November 15 2017, M5.4 earthquake hits South Korea on November 15 2017 pictures, M5.4 earthquake hits South Korea on November 15 2017 video
Handong Global University students evacuated as walls of one of the campus buildings crumbled. via Korea Times

Hopefully this wasn’t an attack of their North Korean firends!

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2 COMMENTS

  1. There are no mountain ranges, there are no faults. This was a haarp attack, since one of the nuclear power plants they have is close to the flash they have made. SOB HAARP.

  2. How free of earthquakes is Korea?

    A powerful earthquake struck southern Japan and south-east Korea on Sunday, March 20, causing panic in the affected area. The earthquake shook houses and buildings in both countries. A few buildings collapsed in Japan and the injured were not so many despite the fear that a tsunami would be triggered. Tsunami The tsunami that devastated the coast of many Southeast Asian countries on December 26 showed the impotence of the human being against the strength of Mother Nature.
    Hundreds of thousands of people died under huge waves that were caused by the strongest earthquake recorded in the last fifty years. The December 2004 tsunami had a magnitude of 9.0 on the Richter scale being its epicenter near the Indonesian island of Sumatra. “Tsunami” is the term given to the marine waves that originate by enormous displacements of the earth’s crust. The wave may not be significant in the open ocean but may reach completely unusual heights when it reaches the coast.
    Tsunamis can be especially powerful when the displacement of the earth is vertical and not horizontal. Tectonic plates and seismic belt Certain regions of the planet are more prone to receive earthquakes
    than others. This is due to its location with respect to the “seismic belt”. The theory is used in the study of Teutonic plates and is widely accepted today. According to this, the earth’s crust is made up
    of several rigid, huge and thin plates that move among themselves. A failure at the edge of these plates usually results in an earthquake. Scientists refer to the limits of these earth plates with the name of seismic belt. Is the Korean peninsula free of earthquakes? Korea is relatively free of earthquakes compared to Japan. In the Japanese archipelago thousands of tremors are felt per year.
    Japan is located on a seismic belt but its neighbor, Korea, is just outside it. However, there are no total guarantees that the Korean territory is completely safe due to the proximity of the peninsula to the seismic belt. Earthquake damage in Korea Although Korea is relatively free of earthquakes there are chances that the peninsula could be hit by a tsunami. Earthquake records in Korea. (Fourteenth century at the beginning of the twentieth century) more than 40 earthquakes recorded in documents of that time.

    1936 Earthquake in the Ssanggye Temple (magnitude: 5.1)
    1978 Earthquake on Mount Songni (magnitude: 5.2)
    1981 Earthquake in the sea near Pohang (magnitude: 4.8)
    1999 Earthquake in the sea near Yangyang (magnitude: 4.2)

    The most powerful earthquake recorded in Korea happened in Hongseong, in the southern
    Chungcheong Province on October 7, 1978. It was 5.2 on the Richter scale. Two people were injured and there was damage for a total of 2 million US dollars. Tsunami records in Korea A tsunami hit Korea after an earthquake in Honshu, Japan, on May 26, 1983. As a result there was one death, two missing and two injured. The damages are calculated at a total of 370 million won. Since 1999, South Korea has not had more earthquakes, until recently. This is pretty strange!

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