A stream of solar wind is blowing around Earth faster than 600 km/s. This is causing intermittent G1-class geomagnetic storms and Arctic auroras. According to NOAA forecasters there is a 55% chance of G1-storms through Dec. 19th as Earth continues its passage through the stream of solar wind. The gaseous material is emerging from a hole in the sun’s atmosphere.

But in polar regions, the stream of solar wind seems to be more penetrating than usual, creating an extra-colorful display for Arctic sky watchers:

geomagnetic unrest december 2017, geomagnetic unrest december 2017 pictures, geomagnetic unrest december 2017 video
A real firework over Sweden: Pink, green and white northern lights. By Marianne Bergli via Spaceweather
geomagnetic unrest december 2017, geomagnetic unrest december 2017 pictures, geomagnetic unrest december 2017 video
A hole in the sun send solar particules 600km/s toward Earth creating amazing sky shows up North. By Marianne Bergli via Spaceweather
geomagnetic unrest december 2017, geomagnetic unrest december 2017 pictures, geomagnetic unrest december 2017 video
Pink and white colors mean the solar wind stream seems to be more penetrating than usual. By Marianne Bergli via Spaceweather
geomagnetic unrest december 2017, geomagnetic unrest december 2017 pictures, geomagnetic unrest december 2017 video
This northern lights outburst in Kvaløya, Norway, was just crazy. By Marianne Bergli via Spaceweather

These colors are somewhat unusual for a G1 geomagnetic storm.  In contrast to green auroras that form when solar wind particles hit oxygen atoms 100 km to 300 km above Earth’s surface, the rare pink northern lights appear when the energetic particles descend lower than usual, striking nitrogen molecules at the 100 km level and below.

This intermittent G1 geomagnetic storm seem to be more penetrating than usual, creating an extra-colorful display for Arctic sky watchers.

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3 COMMENTS

  1. […] A stream of solar wind is blowing around Earth faster than 600 km/s. This is causing intermittent G1-class geomagnetic storms and Arctic auroras. According to NOAA forecasters there is a 55% chance of G1-storms through Dec. 19th as Earth continues its passage through the stream of solar wind. The gaseous material is emerging from a hole in the sun’s atmosphere.  Read more… […]

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