Cyclone Kyarr becomes most powerful storm on the planet, going from the equivalent of a Category 2 to Category 4 storm in just six hours – South Coast of Oman flooded

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The northern hemisphere’s quietest tropical cyclone basin is currently going off.

Cyclone Kyarr formed on Thursday and quickly spun up in the Indian Ocean into the most powerful storm on the planet.

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Cyclone Kyarr picture via Twitter

Rains, winds and storm surges from the Arabian Sea’s strongest cyclone in a decade hit Oman’s south coast on Tuesday morning.

Cyclone Kyarr rapidly intensified over the weekend, going from the equivalent of a Category 2 to Category 4 storm in just six hours on Saturday.

Then for a few hours it reached Category 5:

During its rapid intensification, Kyarr’s pressure bombed out to 915 millibars. And this reading set a new record for Arabian Sea cyclones. The all-time low pressure record for the basin was set by another cyclone back in 1999.

It’s also the first such system to form in the Arabian Sea since June 2007’s Cyclone Gonu, which made landfall in the Middle East.

The super cyclonic storm is currently packing winds of around 150 mph.

Kyarr Will Have No Major Impacts On Land

The good news is that Kyarr is well out to sea.

The storm is pointed toward Oman, but it’s expected to turn southwest and then track parallel to the coast.

Still, rains, winds and storm surges from the Arabian Sea’s strongest cyclone in a decade hit Oman’s south coast on Tuesday morning.

Along the way, it will slowly begin to weaken.

Early next week, it could potentially bring impacts to the Horn of Africa, but it’s still way too early to talk about what they could look like.

Most Intense Cyclone Season On Record In The Indian Ocean

Beyond individual superlatives, Kyarr also pushed the Indian Ocean to set a record for its most intense cyclone season on record. Scientists use a metric known as accumulated cyclone energy (ACE) to take a big picture view of cyclone seasons.

ACE essentially adds up the windspeed measurements from all storms in the basin over time, giving a clearer metric than just the number of storms of how intense a season was.

In the case of the Indian Ocean, ACE is up to 53.9 or more than five times the normal ACE for this time of year.

It also represents a record for the most intense Indian Ocean cyclone season on record.

The basin is usually sleepier than the Atlantic and parts of the Pacific, but the strong Positive Indian Ocean Dipole currently going on, a natural climate pattern, has given a boost to tropical cyclones in the western portion of the basin this year. [TheNational, Gizmodo]

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