Antarctic Ice Shelf

It's only fair to share...Share on Facebook2Tweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+0Pin on Pinterest3Share on VKShare on LinkedIn0Digg thisShare on Reddit0Share on StumbleUpon0Print this pageBuffer this pageEmail this to someone

Antarctic Shelf Ice

Large ice streams drain the interior of the continent and form ice shelves. These ice sheets, which are at least 2 meters above sea level, float over large areas and are fed from the ice, glaciers and/ or ice streams. The two major ice shelves of the earth are in the Antarctic. They are called the Ross ice shelf with 473’000 km2 and the Filchner-Ronne ice shelf with 422’000 km2. Other smaller ice shelves exist and are indicated in the picture below.

ice shelf, ice shelf antarctica, ross ice shelf, larsen ice shelf, antarctica ice
Antarctica is home to a number of ice shelves. The formations are also found along Arctic coastlines

Over 40% of the 30000 km long coastline consist of ice shelf. The ice shelf holds the continent together and protects it against the stormy Southern Ocean. A portion of the ice shelf is on water – another part moves on to the land, where it is fixed. At this boundary, there are strong tensions which result in ice fractures.

At the extreme end of the ice shelf, also called the ice barrier, the ice shelf loses contact with the seabed and large tabular icebergs break off into the sea. Sometimes, the ice thickness can reach 200m thick at these shear zone.

-> Continue to Antarctica Iceberg Pictures

<- Go back to My Antarctica Pictures

It's only fair to share...Share on Facebook2Tweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+0Pin on Pinterest3Share on VKShare on LinkedIn0Digg thisShare on Reddit0Share on StumbleUpon0Print this pageBuffer this pageEmail this to someone

NO COMMENTS

LEAVE A REPLY