Amazing waterfalls cascade down Sacred Uluru as severe weather brings heavy rain to Northern Territory, Australia

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Over the weekend Uluṟu received more than 46mm of rain.

The unique and extraordinary weather event saw tourists and locals alike flocking to the National Park to get a glimpse of the full flowing waterfalls cascading down the sacred rock.

Here some awesome pictures shared by Uluṟu-Kata Tjuṯa National Park staff on Facebook:

uluru waterfalls, uluru waterfalls video, uluru waterfalls pictures, Waterfalls cascade down Uluru as severe weather brings heavy rain to Nothern Territory in Australia
Waterfalls cascade down Uluru as severe weather brings heavy rain to Nothern Territory in Australia. Picture via Facebook
uluru waterfalls, uluru waterfalls video, uluru waterfalls pictures, Waterfalls cascade down Uluru as severe weather brings heavy rain to Nothern Territory in Australia
Waterfalls cascade down Uluru as severe weather brings heavy rain to Nothern Territory in Australia. Picture via Facebook
uluru waterfalls, uluru waterfalls video, uluru waterfalls pictures, Waterfalls cascade down Uluru as severe weather brings heavy rain to Nothern Territory in Australia
Waterfalls cascade down Uluru as severe weather brings heavy rain to Nothern Territory in Australia. Picture via Facebook
uluru waterfalls, uluru waterfalls video, uluru waterfalls pictures, Waterfalls cascade down Uluru as severe weather brings heavy rain to Nothern Territory in Australia
Waterfalls cascade down Uluru as severe weather brings heavy rain to Nothern Territory in Australia. Picture via Facebook

As the temperature drops and a fog encompasses Uluṟu, the arid desert explodes with colour and life.

Rainwater on the rock’s surface causes it to change colour. From dark burgundy to shining silver and even black, every side of Uluru takes a different shade, making this spectacle a photographer’s delight.

Following the rain, desert plants bloom and many animals emerge to mate and feed.

Uluru receives about 300mm of rain a year on average, meaning the park saw about a sixth of its total yearly rainfall in just two days.

Rainfall has already caused smaller waterfalls at Uluru a couple of times this past summer, but the weekend’s deluge made for particularly strong falls.

Nearby Alice Springs has recorded “above average” rainfall so far this year, with about 50mm falling in the 24 hours to Monday morning.

Parks Australia says seeing Uluru and its waterfalls after heavy rain is an experience only a lucky few get to have, with the iconic red and golden sunrise and sunset views common for most of the year.

With the increased rainfall, please ensure you are checking all weather conditions before visiting the park and look after the safety of yourself and others by driving to the conditions, and remember – if it’s flooded, forget it.

Australia is currently experiencing unprecedented wet weather, spider and snake invasions as well as a mouse plague. [Facebook, ABC]

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