Annular solar eclipse in Africa in pictures

Today, sky watchers in more than 50 African countries witnessed a solar eclipse.

On Thursday, Sept. 1st, the new Moon passed in front of the sun, covering as much as 97% of the solar disk. And this is how the sun looked from around the continent:

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solar eclipse, annular solar eclipse september 2016, solar eclipse september 2016, solar eclipse africa september 2016 pictures
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solar eclipse, annular solar eclipse september 2016, solar eclipse september 2016, solar eclipse africa september 2016 pictures
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solar eclipse, annular solar eclipse september 2016, solar eclipse september 2016, solar eclipse africa september 2016 pictures
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solar eclipse, annular solar eclipse september 2016, solar eclipse september 2016, solar eclipse africa september 2016 pictures
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solar eclipse, annular solar eclipse september 2016, solar eclipse september 2016, solar eclipse africa september 2016 pictures
via VK.com

The annular solar eclipse occurred over Africa on 1 September 2016. From Réunion Island, the first contact took place at approximately 08:23 UTC and the annular solar eclipse reached its maximum at 10:09 UTC creating an amazing “ring of fire” effect.

solar eclipse, annular solar eclipse september 2016, solar eclipse september 2016, solar eclipse africa september 2016 pictures
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solar eclipse, annular solar eclipse september 2016, solar eclipse september 2016, solar eclipse africa september 2016 pictures
via VK.com
solar eclipse, annular solar eclipse september 2016, solar eclipse september 2016, solar eclipse africa september 2016 pictures
Andreas Möller via Spaceweather.com
solar eclipse, annular solar eclipse september 2016, solar eclipse september 2016, solar eclipse africa september 2016 pictures
Andreas Möller via Spaceweather.com

In an annular solar eclipse, the Moon is too far from the Earth to block out the entire Sun, leaving the Sun peeking out over the Moon’s disk in a ring of fire.

In 2012 an annular eclipse of the Sun was visible over a narrow path that crossed the northern Pacific Ocean and several western U.S. states.

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