400,000 chickens, turkeys and emus euthanized as bird flu spreads in Australia

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bird flu australia, More than 400,000 birds have been euthanized as bird flu spreads across Australia
More than 400,000 birds have been euthanized as bird flu spreads across Australia. Picture: ABC Rural: Grace Whiteside

The Australian state of Victoria has had to euthanize huge numbers of poultry, among them thousands of baby chicks, in a bid to stem the spread of the bird influenza.

Choosing between bad and worse, poultry farmers in Victoria have decimated their livestock, with a whopping 400,000 turkeys, chickens, and emus (2,000 babies too) being killed out of fear they could be a great risk of transmitting the contagion.

The Victorian Farmers Federation Egg Group said that the loss would be devastating for both large and small producers “not just emotionally but financially as well.

Australia’s Agriculture Minister David Littleproud responded with sympathy to the news, assuring that the government understands the impact of the difficult decisions that need to be made.” 

Meanwhile, at least eight countries have temporarily banned the import of Victorian poultry products as the state’s outbreak of bird flu continues.

And if you take into account the mysterious flesh-eating bacteria that is currently sweeping across the same Victoria, I gess the state will become a no man’s land in a few months:

The dramatic campaign comes after avian influenza – otherwise known as bird flu or avian flu – was first discovered at an emu farm and an egg farm in Victoria in late-July. Authorities have placed the facility in quarantine, while issuing advisories to local farmers.

Infected birds have since been found in six poultry farms across Victoria.

Agriculture Victoria said three different strains of differing severity have been detected, which meant that the outbreaks were not all connected.

Bird flu is a contagious disease that predominantly affects chickens, ducks, geese, turkeys, guinea fowl, quail, pheasants, and ostriches. While there are lots of types of contagion, the virus strains are destroyed by cooking.

Some of them, however, are dangerous to humans, most notably the H5N1 strain, which can infect humans. The reported mortality rate is around 60%, the World Health Organization believes. The biggest risk to humans stems from close contact with infected birds. This means farmers mucking out and handling poultry are more likely to catch it than others.

This appears to be the second outbreak affecting Australia after Corona. More epidemic news on Strange Sounds and Steve Quayle. [ABC.au]

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6 COMMENTS

  1. How do we know they aren’t lying as they’ve LIED about COVID19?? What if they’re using FAULTY tests the way they do for COVID? What if they are purposefully destroying good animals to destroy the food sources to then control the masses?

  2. Migratory birds spread bioweaponized bird-flu. I muck around with geese and ducks. Lost more than I saved. Its 98% fatal. The ones I saved did spread herd immunity. Lost only three birds this season. Symptoms include loss of balance, appetite, lethargy, phlegm, gasping, and depression. Some birds will try and fight to survive. Once shock sets in, they dont usually make it. If they stop eating, open their beaks, and shoot some electrolytes, amox, and mashed peas down their gullet. Saved a female goose, and female duck this way.

    • .50 cal I’m loosing birds rapidly, I’m dosing water with Corid but it’s not working. What is Amox and are your treating the water? Any advise would be greatly appreciated

  3. 1% are destroying food on purpose why you think they stocked up on peanut butter at capitol bldg…food is a weapon need to go to new Zealand or were they live and do justice to them they elites are leaving city’s cause they gonna claim fake astroiod Cummins when it’s teslas death ray…

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