AR2758: New Sunspot From the Next Solar Cycle 25 Produces Intense Shortwave Solar Radio Bursts

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A new sunspot is emerging in the sun’s southern hemisphere, and it looks like a member of new Solar Cycle 25.

And Sunspot AR2758 has even produced one of the first solar radio bursts of Solar Cycle 25. Listen to it below!

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Map of the first sunspot of Solar Cycle 25. Picture via NASA

A new sunspot numbered “AR2758” belongs to the new solar cycle 25.

It was captured on a magnetic map of the sun’s surface from NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory.

How do we know this sunspot belongs to Solar Cycle 25?

The southern sunspots from old Solar Cycle 24 have a -/+ polarity. This sunspot is the opposite: +/-.

Sunspots switch polarities from one solar cycle to the next. AR2744 is therefore a member of Solar Cycle 25.

So far this year, there have been 4 numbered sunspots, and 3 (75%) belonged to Solar Cycle 25.

In comparison, only 17% were from Solar Cycle 25 in 2019 and none in 2018.

First solar radio bursts of Solar Cycle 25

Meanwhile, sunspot AR2758 has produced one of the first solar radio bursts of Solar Cycle 25 which was captured by Thomas Ashcraft’s amateur radio telescope in New Mexico:

Solar radio bursts are caused by beams of electrons, generating a ripple of plasma waves and radio emissions, known to disorient the navigation of whales, causing them to strand on beaches.

There are actually five different types of solar radio bursts. The one recorded is a mix of Type III and Type V.

Even in the height of solar maximum, this would be considered a strong solar burst!

Solar Cycle 25 is still weak, but it is coming. Be ready! [Spaceweather]

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